.
Connect with us

Living without a smartphone

By

Living without a smartphone sucks, but… Let’s start from the beggining.

When I was little, my parents and I moved to a village that was once part of Russia’s territory. In winter, it was freezing here, so my brother and I watched the series while hiding under warm blankets. But once a disaster happened—the power went out. Mom and dad took out the candles… Even though the candles smelled delicious, we felt disgusting because we couldn’t watch the animated series “Transformers” and the Mexican telenovelas.

True, the electricity has disappeared not only in our house—it has disappeared throughout the village!

What do you think happened next?

A day passed, a second, but there was no electricity. Parents said the electricians tried to fix the fault but failed because there was too much snow. So we had nothing to do. You start looking around when there is no electricity at home (back then, about smartphones one could read only in fantasy books). We spent more and more time outdoors; made friends with our neighbors. 

A few weeks later, the snow began to melt, and electricians restored electricity to the house. Anyway, my brother and I already had new friends. We haven’t watched as much TV anymore as we used to. 

But later the “Zhiliton” computers knocked on our door.

Zhiliton

And after that, phones conquered the market. 

The phone has become a type of drug that has diminished our closeness to nature and the people around us. 

And maybe the phone itself would not be such a problem, but it facilitates access to the Internet… Remember the old Nokia that we only used to make calls? We used to connect with people on these adjoining phones, and now it’s completely different. It seems that we have the whole world in this block, but instead of the real one, we have a synthetic world. The real world is outside, on the other side of the door, where friends gather, talking to each other face to face, not to the screen.  

How does the phone harm (a study)

Different health problems that appear to be a result of increased cell phone usage have been published by scientists from throughout the world:

  • Salivary gland tumors.
  • Dizziness and migraines.
  • Less sleep and poor sleep quality.
  • In human cells, variations in the synthesis of particular proteins.
  • Sperm count and quality are both lower.
  • Electrohypersensitivity is a disorder that causes skin irritation, especially on the face.
  • Children are more likely to get malignant tumors and have behavioral issues.

But do cell phones really harm your health?

The Nation center for health research published an article about a controversy connected with cell phones. It is argued that the older studies are not entirely accurate.

Even though epidemiological research suggests otherwise, other factors make it challenging to measure cell phone users’ impact on cancer. For example:

  1. The technology and frequency of usage have changed drastically over time.
  2. Unknown exposures or traits could cause any link between cell phones and cancers.
  3. Biases in collection data occur, making this type of study flawed at best but still rather exciting nonetheless!

So we can guess how much phones damage us. But without any study, I can say that the phone is really bad for the eyes (because of it my eyesight has deteriorated) and it clearly changes us as human beings. Sure, the phone saves time, but I suggest everyone see what happens if they live without their phone and TV for at least a week. What’s the point of it?

Three benefits of living without a smartphone

1. You will have more time.

If you do not use your phone or even a computer, you won’t waste time on YouTube videos or Instagram anymore. You will have more time for yourself. You will have more time to regularly go to the GYM for a healthy mindset that boosts creativity!

When the phone is not on, you will find new ways of spending time. For example, in the same evening, you will try walking. Walking helps clear your mind. It will help to relax more than before! Of course, I know you were doing this before, but trust me, it works better if you know that your phone is off.

Your mindset is changing. For example, when I decide to be without a phone all day, I get up in the morning and write down all the work so that it would be possible to assign it to a responsible person who will do all the work without me. Give it a try, and you will develop a leader in yourself over time.

2. It’s good for your brain and body.

I know people who work with a mobile phone for more than three hours a day. But it’s useful for a person to change the tools of work as often as possible. This means that on working days it’s good to work with both the computer and the notebook as well as…

Unfortunately, few people keep notebooks these days. And yet when you write, you sit in a position other than when working at the computer or sitting with your mobile phone? If you only sit at the computer, you may have back problems. However, if you change postures, the body will feel better!

3. Your vision remains sharp!

The less time you spend near the screens, the more minor vision problems you will have. “But my eyesight is fine,” someone will say. I have a message for him. When you are young, you can watch the screen 12 hours a day. But after a long time, you may feel the change. I hope you will take care of your vision?

To see the beauty that surrounds us (sunsets, nature), I underwent eye surgery. My vision was minus six. I only worsened it with computer games, movies, and work near the computer.

How long should you live without a phone?

There are differing opinions on how long it’s worth living without a phone. Some say you don’t need it at all. Others suggest doing an “attention diet.” That is, they offer to turn off the phone for two months. I suggest taking breaks every day. It’s much smarter.

I propose to make a habit, devote time to yourself every day, then you don’t have to take breaks from the phone.

Read:

Living without a smartphone
A story about a happiness factory
How to be happy

 

Let’s discuss!

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *